Category Archives: Uncategorized

Showcasing Alaska Anniversaries

There are so many important anniversaries in Alaska this year that we had to reach into our collections to share some of what we have with you! So we’ve put together special displays on Level 2 in Rasmuson Library. They are packed with items from our historical collections – maps, photographs, ephemera, and much more! We are celebrating several important historical events:

  • UAF’s centennial
  • The 150 anniversary of Russia’s sale of Alaska to the United States
  • The 100th birthday of Denali National Park
  • The 75th anniversary of the Alaska Highway
  • The 75th anniversary of the Alaska-Siberia Route
  • The 50th anniversary of the Fairbanks flood

You can see (and borrow!) some of the university’s first library books. Inside the Paul H. McCarthy Research Room, two displays feature student handbooks from 1964 and 1984, and a selection of early University of Alaska catalogs.

First college books. This selection of UAF library books was reconstructed from an essay written by Alaska Agricultural College and School of Mines Leslie Marchand, professor of English and French. The list of fifty-seven book appeared in Farthest-North Collegian in 1925. Courtesy of Alaska and Polar Regions Collections & Archives, Ulyana Korotkova.

Filming Denali: Denali National Park’s 100th Birthday. Courtesy of Alaska Film Archives, Angela Schmidt.

View of exhibit. Thanks to Kathy Arndt, Angela Schmidt, Charles Hilton, and Ulyana Korotkova for making it happen! Happy Birthday UAF!

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Lael Morgan Collection

Lael Morgan was a UAF professor of journalism who wrote for major U.S. and Alaska newspapers and magazines, and who wrote books about Alaska, including the popular Good Time Girls of the Alaska-Yukon Gold Rush. The photos that appear in Alaska’s Digital Archives were part of “Miles and Miles,” an exhibit about African-American builders of ALCAN (Alaska Highway). She curated the 1992 exhibit for the University of Alaska Museum of the North.

This portion of the collection preserves unique photographic images that give a glimpse into the one-third of the U.S. Army ALCAN construction troops as they build, repair, and march along the highway in 1942-1943. Several photographs from the Lael Morgan Collection are a part of the Rasmuson Library 75th Anniversary of the Alaska Highway exhibit, which is on display on Level 2 of the library.

Alaska Highway, road construction, soldiers, Afro-Americans, World War II

Walter Mason’s A Company 97th building a pioneer bridge. Lael Morgan Collection, UAF-2012-71-351, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

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Ernest and Helen Watson Album

After graduating from the Evansville College in Indiana, Ernest and Helen Watson went to Alaska as teachers. From 1925 to 1926, they were stationed in St. Paul on the Pribilof Islands. Their goal was to earn money and continue their education. Ernest eventually became a pediatrician, and Helen received an advanced degree in library science.

During their stay in St. Paul, the couple took photos of wildlife, people, and activities in the area, as well as their trips to or from St. Paul.

Helen Watson, teachers, St. Paul

Helen Watson on board the Vega in Bering Sea, July 1925. Ernest and Helen Watson Album, UAF-1993-186-1, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

St. Paul, villages

Village of St. Paul, 1925-1926. Ernest and Helen Watson Album, UAF-2002-158-219, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

 

children, school children, St. Paul

Aleut children from the senior school on St. Paul Island, 1925. Ernest and Helen Watson Album, UAF-1993-186-2, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

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Jack Jefford Photographs

APRCA indexer Ulyana recently finished the Jack Jefford Photographs and offers the following description.

Jack Jefford (1910-1979) was an Alaska pilot whose first job in Alaska was with Mirow Air Service that provided shipping and transportation to the Seward Peninsula mines. During one of his flights, Jack crashed on a remote mountain, and was rescued after several days of solitude. Employed by the Civil Aeronautics Authority from 1940, he put important air routes on maps of Alaska, some of which were used during World War II. The fifty-seven images digitized for Alaska’s Digital Archives feature breathtaking aerial views, as well as day-to-day tasks of a small airplane pilot.

Crater of Mt. Magic from 500’. Jack Jefford Photographs, UAF-1966-11-25, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

At Kiwalik. Jack Jefford Photographs, UAF-1966-11-45, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Shipment bags, Mirow Air Service. Jack Jefford Photographs, UAF-1966-11-258, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

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Coffee Hour at the Archives

This is the first posting by our new Assistant Archivist, Erin Wahl.

On Monday, August 29th, our new academic year begins here at UAF. As a sort of celebration of a brand new semester, the folks down in APRCA decided to host a coffee hour for library faculty, staff, and student workers. Some of us put our chef’s hats on and contributed some awesome baked goods to the cause, while others pitched in some dough for nice coffee.

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Library faculty, staff, and student workers enjoying coffee hour.

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Assistant Archivist Charles Hilton (left) discusses the Alaska Commercial Company Records with Interim Dean of Libraries Suzan Hahn (right) and ANCSA Project Director Robert Drozda (center).

We also wanted to share with our fun coworkers, some of the amazing stuff we get to see every day. So we decided to channel everyone’s inner history nerd by pulling items from some of our favorite, new, recently used, and cool collections for a library show-and-tell.

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Library faculty, staff, and student workers in the Paul H. McCarthy Research Room.

Some of the things our colleagues got to feast their eyes on? A ledger from the Alaska Commercial Company, brand new acquisitions of rare maps that have not yet been cataloged, a photo album from the 1890s, colorful maps of Alaska produced for tourism, some fun correspondence between family members from a recently processed collection, and some other goodies. We even put an unprocessed, recently donated box of slides next to a box of slides that had been processed as an example of the kind of work that we do on a daily basis.

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The Elmer E. Rasmuson Library on a rainy day with hot coffee!

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Library faculty, staff, and student workers in the Paul H. McCarthy Research Room.

It was fun to have our friends from other floors down for a visit before the busyness of a new academic year begins. Thanks for coming everyone! Next time I’m thinking…ugly sweater Christmas theme?

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Alaska and Polar Regions Bibliographer and Curator of Rare Books Dr. Katherine Arndt (left) discusses new rare map acquisitions with Library Development and Public Information Officer Suzanne Bishop (right).

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Clark M. Garber Collection

Our indexer,  Alex has finished describing the Clark M. Garber Collection which we have put online in Alaska’s Digital Archives.  Here’s what he has to say:

The photos in this collection come from an unpublished manuscript, entitled ‘Atanak, the White Eskimo: a True Story of Alaska’ by Clark M. Garber as told to Edward R. Johnson. Together, the manuscript and its photos detail the years Garber (aka ‘Atanak’) spent working in Alaska for the U.S. Bureau of Education, from 1925 – 1933. The photographs consist mainly of portraits and action shots depicting Garber’s interactions with Alaska Natives, though the collection also contains maps, landscapes, and others.

Atanak.

Atanak.

Of all my photos, though, my favorites are the portraits. I love the windows they can open into others’ lives, and I love the ways in which the notes and captions can sometimes open windows within those windows. Take, for example, ‘Atanak.’ Here we have Garber in Native attire. The caption reads, simply, ‘Atanak.’ A note included with the manuscript indicates that this image was to be used as the manuscript’s ‘Frontispiece,’ which suggests to me that this was exactly how Garber—the manuscript’s author—intended us to see him. There’s something about that expression of intent that alters my perception of him. It’s not a false intent, exactly. But it is crafted.

Oonalik, chief of the Innuits at Wales.

Oonalik, chief of the Innuits at Wales.

Contrast that with this image: ‘Oonalik, chief of the Innuits at Wales.’ Note his bearing and his posture here. If I were to remove the caption, and present you with only the image of Oonalik, would you have any doubt if I told you he was a chief?

Ooganeesee, Eskimo girl of Wales.

Ooganeesee, Eskimo girl of Wales.

My favorite of all the photos, though, is ‘Ooganeesee, Eskimo girl of Wales.’ I love her proud stance here, the way in which the wind can be seen stirring the fur on her parka. In particular, I love her selection of story to share with Garber: ‘How an Eskimo Maid Jilted Her Suitor.’ There’s a certain synergy between her story selection and the way she’s represented by the photo. Maybe ‘How an Eskimo Maid Jilted Her Suitor’ was a favorite of hers. I, for one, wouldn’t doubt it.

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William A. Egan papers

Our indexer,  Ulyana has finished describing the William A. Egan papers which we have put online in Alaska’s Digital Archives.  Here’s what she has to say:

The William A. Egan Papers feature photos that belonged to William Allen “Bill” Egan, the first Alaska Governor who served from 1959 to 1966. He was reelected in 1970-1974. Egan’s widow, Neva Egan, gave his papers to the Alaska and Polar Regions Collections & Archives. In 1985, a special appropriation from the Alaska State Legislature funded the processing of this important political collection. The photos were arranged and identified by India Spartz. The images depict public events, politicians and public officers, and the city of Juneau.

Bill Egan taking the oath of office.

Bill Egan taking the oath of office.

Alaska’s three democratic electors – Lucille Marshall (Juneau), Clara McCutcheon (Anchorage), and Annella Davis (Fairbanks), 1965.

Alaska’s three democratic electors – Lucille Marshall (Juneau), Clara McCutcheon (Anchorage), and
Annella Davis (Fairbanks), 1965.

Officials of the University of Alaska view plans for the new health, physical education and recreation building which is planned for the Fairbanks University campus.

Officials of the University of Alaska view plans for the new health, physical education
and recreation building which is planned for the Fairbanks University campus.

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Leslie A. Marchand Photographs

Our indexer,  Ulyana has finished describing the Leslie A. Marchand Photographs which we have put online in Alaska’s Digital Archives.  Here’s what she has to say:

Leslie A. Marchand Photographs belonged to Alaska Agricultural College and School of Mines professor who worked there in 1923-27 and 1934-35. Winter issue of 1924 Farthest-North Collegian listed Leslie A. Marchand as Professor of French and Instructor in English who “graduated from the University of Washington with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, in 1922, and the following year received a Master’s Degree with a major in English and minor in French from the same university.” The forty-three images feature Alaska Agricultural College and School of Mines students and faculty, early Alaska pilots, Fairbanks city streets, and dog races. Fairbanks was becoming more modern – it had its own college, and the city conveniences included water delivery and air mail services.

Students and faculty ready for cold weather.

Students and faculty ready for cold weather.

Blue Crystal Water Co. water carrier near Andrew Nerland Warehouse, Fairbanks.

Blue Crystal Water Co. water carrier near Andrew Nerland Warehouse, Fairbanks.

New Alaska mail service.

New Alaska mail service.

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Elizabeth Hayes Goddard Diary

Our indexer,  Ulyana has finished describing the Elizabeth Hayes Goddard Diary collection which we have put online in Alaska’s Digital Archives.  Here’s what she has to say:

Elizabeth Hayes, born in New York in 1898, graduated from the Mary C. Wheeler School, Providence, Rhode Island and from the Rochester Business Institute, Rochester, New York. In 1943, she married George W. Goddard, then Colonel in the U.S. Air Corps. They had one daughter, Diane. Fifty-three photographs featured in Alaska’s Digital Archives illustrate Elizabeth Goddard’s diary that documents her 1934 trip along the Yukon and Koyukuk Rivers – from Vancouver to Dawson, Dawson to Eagle, Eagle to Fort Yukon, Fort Yukon to Koyukuk Station, up the Koyukuk to Allakaket, Koyukuk Station to Anvik, and Anvik upstream to Nenana. In foreword to her typed and bound 150-pages diary, Elizabeth Goddard wrote, “From the first day aboard ‘Pelican IV’ in the summer of 1934 I jotted down everything we saw and everybody we met along the Yukon and Koyukuk rivers in Alaska.”

Pelican IV.

Pelican IV.

Robert Service's cabin - Dawson, Y.T. Bluebells and wild roses in yard.

Robert Service’s cabin – Dawson, Y.T. Bluebells and wild roses in yard.

vilda.alaska.edu_-2

Indian children of the mission school, Fort Yukon.

 

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Reverend S. Hall Young Album

At Muir Glacier.

At Muir Glacier.

Our indexer,  Ulyana has finished describing the Reverend S. Hall Young Album which we have put online in Alaska’s Digital Archives.  Here’s what she has to say: Reverend S. Hall Young Album features 106 images of his 1913 summer cruise to Alaska and Siberian waters. The big game hunting expedition, organized by Young’s son-in-law Frank E. Kleinschmidt, consisted of Dr. S. Hall Young, Kleinschmidt, E. Marshall Scull, Gilpin Lovering, Dr. Arthur W. Elting, Alfred M. Collins, and taxidermists Albrecht and Kusche. The hunters, except Lowering, who joined in Nome, boarded steamer Jefferson in Seattle. E. Marshall Scull, who in 1914 described this expedition in a book titled Hunting in the Arctic and Alaska, stated that the itinerary was: “to traverse the Inside Passage by steamer, cross the White Pass to the head of the Yukon River, take steamer to Dawson and see the Klondike gold fields, go down the great river across the boundary into Alaska, to Fairbanks, the chief interior town, and emerge at Nome. . .” From Nome, the party boarded Ed Born’s P. J. Abler, and sailed across to Siberia, toward Wrangell Island in the Arctic, back to southwestern Alaska, and to Seattle. P.J. Abler’s crew included Captain Larsson, P.J. Abler’s owner and engineer Ed Born, assistant engineer Frank Born, Mate Hanson, and a cook and a cabin boy. About half of the album’s photographs were taken by Frank Kleinschmidt, whose other interest included filming a motion picture. The other half consists of photo postcards.

Mike Utcht, our guide, and family.

Mike Utcht, our guide, and family.

Rev. Young and two other hunters stealing up on walrus.

Rev. Young and two other hunters stealing up on walrus.

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