Taylor Family Photographs

APRCA indexer Ulyana recently finished the Taylor Family Photographs and offers the following description.
The Taylor Family Photograph collection features life in interior Alaska from 1900-1920. It houses many pictures of Nenana, Iditarod, and Ruby, including the Iditarod Courthouse, Ruby Public School, and Fourth of July races and games in Ruby. William J. Taylor (1886-1985) immigrated to the United States as a child. He studied mining in Colorado, and joined the Klondike stampede in 1898. After working in the Yukon gold fields, he moved to the Iditarod region. He and his wife Margaret, whom he met in a mining camp, eventually settled in Nenana. William Taylor worked as a watchmaker and jeweler. He died shortly before his 99th birthday.

William J. Taylor, Nenana. Taylor Family Photographs, UAF-1987-184-149a, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

William J. Taylor, Nenana.
Taylor Family Photographs, UAF-1987-184-149a, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Northwestern. Juneau, Alaska. The front rail is missing because it was chopped off as it was weighing the vessel down. Taylor Family Photographs, UAF-1987-184-137, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Northwestern. Juneau, Alaska. The front rail is missing because it was chopped off as it was weighing the vessel down.
Taylor Family Photographs, UAF-1987-184-137, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Caribou Café. Note on verso reads, “The man with the apron on is Angus. The woman got married a week after I came here. She comes right from Dawson City too.” Taylor Family Photographs, UAF-1987-184-145a, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Caribou Café. Note on verso reads, “The man with the apron on is Angus. The woman got married a week after I came here. She comes right from Dawson City too.”
Taylor Family Photographs, UAF-1987-184-145a, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Charles D. Jones Papers

Ulyana recently completed indexing the Charles D. Jones Papers on Alaska’s Digital Archives. Nice work Ulyana! Read on to see what she has to say about the collection.

This collection that houses signed portraits of members of the first Alaska Territorial Legislature is one of a kind. Two sets of photographs that are pasted inside two albums feature Alaska Territorial Senate and House members, first and second Governors of Alaska Territory, and Senate and House in session. The two albums belonged to Rep. Charles Davenport Jones (terr. H.R. 1913-15; terr. Sen., 1947-51, 1953-57). Throughout his career, he worked as Seward Peninsula Railway employee, prospector, miner, Alaska Road Commission foreman, and U.S. Marshal in Nome area. 

The Territory of Alaska and the Alaska Territorial Legislature were created through passage of the Second Organic Act in 1912. In 1913, the new legislators traveled to Juneau via dogsleds and a steamship. Their first act was to give women the right to vote, seven years before the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified by the states.

Charles D. Jones, Nome. First Territorial Legislature, 1913. House. Charles D. Jones Papers, UAF-913-50, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Charles D. Jones, Nome. First Territorial Legislature, 1913. House.
Charles D. Jones Papers, UAF-913-50, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

 

First Alaska Territorial House of Representatives, 1913. Charles D. Jones Papers, UAF-913-27, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

First Alaska Territorial House of Representatives, 1913.
Charles D. Jones Papers, UAF-913-27, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

 

First Alaska Territorial Senate, 1913. Charles D. Jones Papers, UAF-913-26, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

First Alaska Territorial Senate, 1913.
Charles D. Jones Papers, UAF-913-26, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Happy Halloween from APRCA!

The devilish gal in this photo is identified as Madeline Solomon.  John D. Lyle Papers, UAF-2012-133-241, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

The devilish gal in this photo is identified as Madeline Solomon.
John D. Lyle Papers, UAF-2012-133-241, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Happy Halloween from the Alaska and Polar Regions Collections & Archives!

Halloween pictures are scattered throughout our collections, proving you never can tell what gems you may find. This one is from the John D. Lyle Papers, a 3-box collection of materials about Kaltag, Alaska, a village on the Yukon River. This photo shows an adorable Madeline Solomon as a young girl dressed in a devil costume. Sorry Madeline, but you’re way cuter than you are scary. It doesn’t matter…we still love your costume! Happy Halloween everyone!

William R. Cashen Papers

Ulyana, APRCA’s rockstar processing assistant, recently completed indexing the William R. Cashen Papers on Alaska’s Digital Archives. Ulyana walks us through Cashen’s life below.

William R. Cashen Papers belonged to University of Alaska Fairbanks alumni who edited the first college newspaper, Farthest-North Collegian, from 1934 to 1937. Born in 1914 in Douglas, Alaska to a family of eight children, Bill Cashen left for Fairbanks in 1933 because of an unused Alaska Agricultural College and School of Mines scholarship that was passed down to him. He majored in Mathematics, and graduated in 1937 with General Science degree. While in school, he was a member of College Dramatic Club, and one of several students “qualified” as motion picture projectionists. Bill Cashen took his first airplane ride in Noel Wien’s airplane on July 4, 1934, and his first trip outside Alaska on the Alaska Steamship Aleutian in 1939. He became a faculty member in 1942, and was listed as an assistant professor of civil engineering and mathematics from 1943. The photographic part of the collection consists of slides that portray Alaska Agricultural College and School of Mines (University of Alaska Fairbanks) from 1915 Cornerstone Ceremony to 1970s.

First six matriculates on cornerstone – September 18, 1922. Art Loftus, Roden Davis, Earl Foster, Donald Morgan, Dorothy (Roth) Loftus, Ethel Bailey. William R. Cashen Papers, UAF-2005-6-10, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

First six matriculates on cornerstone – September 18, 1922. Art Loftus, Roden Davis, Earl Foster, Donald Morgan, Dorothy (Roth) Loftus, Ethel Bailey.
William R. Cashen Papers, UAF-2005-6-10, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

 

Jeep in front of Main Dorm – 1944. William R. Cashen Papers, UAF-2005-6-41, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Jeep in front of Main Dorm – 1944.
William R. Cashen Papers, UAF-2005-6-41, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Geophysical Institute, 1969. William R. Cashen Papers, UAF-2005-6-88, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Geophysical Institute, 1969.
William R. Cashen Papers, UAF-2005-6-88, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

E.C. Sharpe Diaries: Spinach Soup

As one way to celebrate Archives Month, some of the folks in the library volunteered to make recipes found in some of our manuscript collections. This post comes courtesy of the lovely Ms. Dee from our awesome Acquisitions and Technical Services Department. These are the people who bring you the wonderful, descriptive entries on Alaska’s Digital Archives. It’s difficult to do our work without support from them and their fantastic indexing skills.

The Sharpe Diaries also include such gems as the picture below, which shows what looks like a child’s writing exercises. Some things haven’t changed all that much since the 1880s and early 1900s. Read on to hear Ms. Dee talk about her experience with an old soup recipe from the E.C. Sharpe Diaries.

Page from Sharpe diary with children's writing. E.C. Sharpe Diaries, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks. Find it in Star Archives.

Page from Sharpe diary with children’s writing.
E.C. Sharpe Diaries, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks. Find it in Star Archives.

I chose to make the Spinach Soup recipe seen below, and transcribed as this:

Put the spinach onto
[stove?] with a tiny bit
of water. [Stew?] for
1/2 hour. Then push
through a sieve. Then
add milk – salt –
pepper – ___ – chicken

So, basically, three ingredients and two spices comprise this recipe. I wonder what made this concoction recipe-worthy to the person who wrote these simple steps down? What could have been forgotten in making up this dish? I looked over this itty bitty recipe in wonder over its simplicity.

Page from Sharpe diary with Spinach Soup recipe. E.C. Sharpe Diaries, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks. Find it in Star Archives.

Started with the main ingredient, the spinach.  A whole plastic bin’s worth of it in all its full leaf majesty before it was sauteed down to a shapeless mound of shriveled and shrunk leaves.

Fresh spinach leaves.

Fresh spinach leaves.

Following the recipe directions, I added in milk (I chose unsweetened almond milk).
Hmmm,  it appears more like a spinach cereal than soup.  If I added the chicken the recipe called for, it would be kicked up a notch to chicken spinach cereal.
Because I’m a vegetarian, and because chicken spinach cereal sounds gross, I didn’t add animals parts to this bowl of swimming spinach leaves.   But I couldn’t leave as is either.  Just look at this sad milky bowl of greens.  I couldn’t force myself to eat of this unappetizing  dish.
Not so appetizing yet...

Not so appetizing yet…

So I busted out the blender, and gave it a good whirl.Look at how spinach cereal transforms in all its bright green glory into a blended soup!

Dee busts out the blender.

Dee busts out the blender…

...and ends up with something new.

…and ends up with something new.

To give it some substance and let’s face it, this bowl of green stuff needed some serious flavor enhancement, I added in a pile of sauteed mushrooms., and garnished it with some crumbled cashews for crunch.

My first foray into blended soups, and it was a good one. In fact, the transformation is a bit stunning. This neon-green, creamy bisque all dolled up in mushrooms and cashews turned out to be quite handsome, quite sophisticated. A spinach soup star was born from the humblest of recipes. It was delicious.

Dee took this old recipe and re-imagined it for a modern audience. Nice work Dee!

Dee took this old recipe and re-imagined it for a modern audience. Nice work Dee!

 

APRCA in the News: Glass-Base Records

Those of you who attended our open house last week might recall the fragile, interesting glass records the Oral History folks were showing off. The Northeast Document Conservation Center recently featured these glass-base records in a short article on their website here. As you can see from the article, these records are one-of-a-kind and an exciting and important addition to our collections, providing a record of an Alaskan Native dialect not often heard anymore. We are very happy that the university saw the need to provide support to have these records preserved.

Gaustad-Bartlett Family Papers

Our indexer Ulyana processed photographs from Gaustad-Bartlett Family Papers. Here is what she had to say about the collection:

Gaustad-Bartlett family photographs depict Fairbanks, Sitka, and Hoonah during 1910 – 1920. The collection includes rare images of the George C. Thomas Memorial Library and Fairbanks public school, as well as photos of Alaska tribal buildings, private houses, and community events.

Interior of the Fairbanks Library, 1915. Gaustad-Bartlett Family Papers, 1972-156-125, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Interior of the Fairbanks Library, 1915.
Gaustad-Bartlett Family Papers, 1972-156-125, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Vide Marie Gaustad Bartlett (1904-1976) attended school in Fairbanks during the school year, and joined her father, O. P. Gaustad, in the Livengood mining district, during summers. Vide completed her high school in Los Angeles, and subsequently earned a university degree and teaching certificate. She taught in Wrangell, Alaska, and in Washington State before marrying E. L. “Bob” Bartlett in August 1930.

Fairbanks soldiers off for the war, 1918. Gaustad-Bartlett Family Papers, 1972-156-313, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Fairbanks soldiers off for the war, 1918.
Gaustad-Bartlett Family Papers, 1972-156-313, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks

E. L. “Bob” Bartlett (1904-1968) was a prominent Alaska politician and a member of the Democratic Party. He attended the University of Washington and Alaska Agricultural College and School of Mines. The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reporter and associate editor, Bob Bartlett also worked as secretary to Alaska’s delegate to Congress Anthony Dimond. He served as Alaska’s delegate to Congress seven times from 1945. E. L. “Bob” Bartlett became Alaska’s first U.S. Senator in 1959.

Fairbanks public school, 1919.  Gaustad-Bartlett Family Papers, 1972-156-126, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Fairbanks public school, 1919.
Gaustad-Bartlett Family Papers, 1972-156-126, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks

W.H. (Bill) Carroll Photographs

Indexer extraordinaire Lisa just finished updating the W. H. (Bill) Carroll Photograph Collection on Alaska’s Digital Archives. W. H. (Bill) Carroll came to Alaska in 1936, and attended the University of Alaska in Fairbanks in 1938. His field of study was Mining Engineering, but his studies were interrupted by World War II. Most of these black-and-white photos were taken between 1938 and 1940, and most are mining photos or pictures of student life at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks. There are several photos of Bill Carroll, but my favorite of him is in a point field, manning a “point hammer.” He evidently worked at the thaw fields in the summertime.

Bill Carroll at his summer's pastime. W. H. Bill Carroll Photograph Collection, 1988-168-39, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Bill Carroll at his summer’s pastime.
W. H. Bill Carroll Photograph Collection, 1988-168-39, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

I always enjoy photos that have a story behind them, like this photo that captured the continuing search for some “store boughten teeth” in the middle of the gold field.

Man digging with pickaxe. W. H. Bill Carroll Photograph Collection, 1988-168-196, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Man digging with pickaxe.
W. H. Bill Carroll Photograph Collection, 1988-168-196, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Quite a number of the photos in this collection were focused on the Fairbanks Ice Carnival, and the beauty pageant that was associated with it. The photos depict the queen and her court on a specially carved ice throne, dressed in parkas. Below is Miss Alaska from either 1938 or 1939.

Miss Alaska. W. H. Bill Carroll Photograph Collection, 1988-168-151, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Miss Alaska.
W. H. Bill Carroll Photograph Collection, 1988-168-151, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

There were many interesting photos of student life at the University of Alaska, so it was hard to choose just one or two to highlight. There are several photos of R.O.T.C. members, such as this one where Army R.O.T.C. cadets were “on guard at the gym.”

Gym with the R.O.T.C. on guard. W. H. Bill Carroll Photograph Collection, 1988-168-71, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Gym with the R.O.T.C. on guard.
W. H. Bill Carroll Photograph Collection, 1988-168-71, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Some things about life on campus don’t seem to change much, but clothing styles certainly have. I am always amazed at how suits were commonly worn by men in that time period, even if they were just studying. One thing that doesn’t change is the enjoyment of hanging out with friends on campus, and there are hints of that in many of these photos. I hope you will take the time to look further into this collection, for it is well worth delving into!

Coffee Hour at the Archives

This is the first posting by our new Assistant Archivist, Erin Wahl.

On Monday, August 29th, our new academic year begins here at UAF. As a sort of celebration of a brand new semester, the folks down in APRCA decided to host a coffee hour for library faculty, staff, and student workers. Some of us put our chef’s hats on and contributed some awesome baked goods to the cause, while others pitched in some dough for nice coffee.

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Library faculty, staff, and student workers enjoying coffee hour.

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Assistant Archivist Charles Hilton (left) discusses the Alaska Commercial Company Records with Interim Dean of Libraries Suzan Hahn (right) and ANCSA Project Director Robert Drozda (center).

We also wanted to share with our fun coworkers, some of the amazing stuff we get to see every day. So we decided to channel everyone’s inner history nerd by pulling items from some of our favorite, new, recently used, and cool collections for a library show-and-tell.

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Library faculty, staff, and student workers in the Paul H. McCarthy Research Room.

Some of the things our colleagues got to feast their eyes on? A ledger from the Alaska Commercial Company, brand new acquisitions of rare maps that have not yet been cataloged, a photo album from the 1890s, colorful maps of Alaska produced for tourism, some fun correspondence between family members from a recently processed collection, and some other goodies. We even put an unprocessed, recently donated box of slides next to a box of slides that had been processed as an example of the kind of work that we do on a daily basis.

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The Elmer E. Rasmuson Library on a rainy day with hot coffee!

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Library faculty, staff, and student workers in the Paul H. McCarthy Research Room.

It was fun to have our friends from other floors down for a visit before the busyness of a new academic year begins. Thanks for coming everyone! Next time I’m thinking…ugly sweater Christmas theme?

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Alaska and Polar Regions Bibliographer and Curator of Rare Books Dr. Katherine Arndt (left) discusses new rare map acquisitions with Library Development and Public Information Officer Suzanne Bishop (right).

Clark M. Garber Collection

Our indexer,  Alex has finished describing the Clark M. Garber Collection which we have put online in Alaska’s Digital Archives.  Here’s what he has to say:

The photos in this collection come from an unpublished manuscript, entitled ‘Atanak, the White Eskimo: a True Story of Alaska’ by Clark M. Garber as told to Edward R. Johnson. Together, the manuscript and its photos detail the years Garber (aka ‘Atanak’) spent working in Alaska for the U.S. Bureau of Education, from 1925 – 1933. The photographs consist mainly of portraits and action shots depicting Garber’s interactions with Alaska Natives, though the collection also contains maps, landscapes, and others.

Atanak.

Atanak.

Of all my photos, though, my favorites are the portraits. I love the windows they can open into others’ lives, and I love the ways in which the notes and captions can sometimes open windows within those windows. Take, for example, ‘Atanak.’ Here we have Garber in Native attire. The caption reads, simply, ‘Atanak.’ A note included with the manuscript indicates that this image was to be used as the manuscript’s ‘Frontispiece,’ which suggests to me that this was exactly how Garber—the manuscript’s author—intended us to see him. There’s something about that expression of intent that alters my perception of him. It’s not a false intent, exactly. But it is crafted.

Oonalik, chief of the Innuits at Wales.

Oonalik, chief of the Innuits at Wales.

Contrast that with this image: ‘Oonalik, chief of the Innuits at Wales.’ Note his bearing and his posture here. If I were to remove the caption, and present you with only the image of Oonalik, would you have any doubt if I told you he was a chief?

Ooganeesee, Eskimo girl of Wales.

Ooganeesee, Eskimo girl of Wales.

My favorite of all the photos, though, is ‘Ooganeesee, Eskimo girl of Wales.’ I love her proud stance here, the way in which the wind can be seen stirring the fur on her parka. In particular, I love her selection of story to share with Garber: ‘How an Eskimo Maid Jilted Her Suitor.’ There’s a certain synergy between her story selection and the way she’s represented by the photo. Maybe ‘How an Eskimo Maid Jilted Her Suitor’ was a favorite of hers. I, for one, wouldn’t doubt it.