William C. Douglass Photographs

William C. Douglass Photographs feature slides of Kennecott Mines – Bonanza, Jumbo, Mother Lode, and Erie. This collection belonged to William C. Douglass, who worked as the Kennecott Mine foreman and superintendent from 1916 to 1929. The richest copper mine in the world that was named as a result of a spelling error operated near the Kennicott Glacier from 1909 to 1938. The Guggenheims and J.P. Morgan (the Alaska Syndicate) that purchased Kennecott, invested $22 million for construction of Copper River and Northwestern Railway alone. Regardless the expenditure, the copper empire did so well that when it went public in 1915, its stock rose from a few dollars to seventy-five dollars a share.

Kennecott Mine

Mill and loaded cars. William C. Douglass Photographs, UAF-2006-86-18, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Jumbo tramway, Jim Dennis

Jim Dennis, Jumbo tramway. William C. Douglass Photographs, UAF-2006-86-6, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Copper River and Northwestern Railway

Snow, Copper River and Northwestern Railway. William C. Douglass Photographs, UAF-2006-86-38, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Talkin’ Turkey

This post got lost in our holiday rush to-do lists, but we didn’t want you to miss out. After putting up the most recent display in the Research Room, featuring past UAF course catalogs, archivists noticed that the page they’d chosen called to mind the food-rich holiday season (turkey, anyone?). These pages are from the course catalog from the University of Alaska’s 1949-1950 academic year. Now that you (like the rest of us) have recovered from the massive amounts of food inhaled during the holidays, we think you won’t groan too much if you take a look at these pages. Do you think you could pass a class on Turkey Management? What about Potato Production?

A selection from one of our current display cases, this course catalog is flipped to the Agriculture class listings. Stop by and see the real thing in our Research Room!

A selection from one of our current display cases, this course catalog is flipped to the Agriculture class listings. Stop by and see the real thing in our Research Room!

Jack Jefford Photographs

APRCA indexer Ulyana recently finished the Jack Jefford Photographs and offers the following description.

Jack Jefford (1910-1979) was an Alaska pilot whose first job in Alaska was with Mirow Air Service that provided shipping and transportation to the Seward Peninsula mines. During one of his flights, Jack crashed on a remote mountain, and was rescued after several days of solitude. Employed by the Civil Aeronautics Authority from 1940, he put important air routes on maps of Alaska, some of which were used during World War II. The fifty-seven images digitized for Alaska’s Digital Archives feature breathtaking aerial views, as well as day-to-day tasks of a small airplane pilot.

Crater of Mt. Magic from 500’. Jack Jefford Photographs, UAF-1966-11-25, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

At Kiwalik. Jack Jefford Photographs, UAF-1966-11-45, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Shipment bags, Mirow Air Service. Jack Jefford Photographs, UAF-1966-11-258, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

George S. Witt Photographs

The George S. Witt Photograph collection includes 157 images – mostly photographs with some real photo postcards. The photographs were taken by George S. Witt who went on walking tours of downtown Fairbanks in 1944. George Sawyer Witt (1913-1996) served in U.S. Army during World War II. He was stationed in Fairbanks, Alaska, in 1943-1944. Witt, who served as a technician, took photos of the city streets, buildings, and businesses, and wrote vivid (sometimes humorous) remarks on the blank side of his photos. The images depict Cushman Street, First and Second Avenues, Empress Theater, Northern Commercial Company, Lomen Company, Model Bakery, Berny Carr’s Department Store, Nordale Hotel, and the Alaska Railroad Depot.

Our main street – Second Avenue, looking from Lacey down toward Cushman. George S. Witt Photographs, UAF-1984-105-44, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Our main street – Second Avenue, looking from Lacey down toward Cushman.
George S. Witt Photographs, UAF-1984-105-44, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

GMC Army Truck. Fairbanks, September 1944. George S. Witt Photographs, UAF-1984-105-89, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

GMC Army Truck. Fairbanks, September 1944.
George S. Witt Photographs, UAF-1984-105-89, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

4th Street, Fairbanks. George S. Witt Photographs, UAF-1984-105-91, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

4th Street, Fairbanks. George S. Witt Photographs, UAF-1984-105-91, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Christmas & New Year’s Closures

Happy Holidays to all of our lovely patrons and friends!

As the term ends and the holiday season begins, we wanted to update everyone on our holiday closures.

The UAF Rasmuson Library will be closed Sunday, December 18th through Tuesday, January 3rd. This is library-wide closure, so it’s not just the archives that will be closed, but the whole library as well.

Also, due to staff shortages, the archives will be open by APPOINTMENT ONLY Wednesday, January 4th through January 6th. Your appointment must be approved by an archives staff member a minimum of 24 hours in advance. Please call 907-474-6400 or email uaf-apr-reference-service@alaska.edu to make an appointment.

The APRCA's fabulous Christmas tree. Happy holidays to you all!

The APRCA’s fabulous Christmas tree. Happy holidays to you all!

Taylor Family Photographs

APRCA indexer Ulyana recently finished the Taylor Family Photographs and offers the following description.
The Taylor Family Photograph collection features life in interior Alaska from 1900-1920. It houses many pictures of Nenana, Iditarod, and Ruby, including the Iditarod Courthouse, Ruby Public School, and Fourth of July races and games in Ruby. William J. Taylor (1886-1985) immigrated to the United States as a child. He studied mining in Colorado, and joined the Klondike stampede in 1898. After working in the Yukon gold fields, he moved to the Iditarod region. He and his wife Margaret, whom he met in a mining camp, eventually settled in Nenana. William Taylor worked as a watchmaker and jeweler. He died shortly before his 99th birthday.

William J. Taylor, Nenana. Taylor Family Photographs, UAF-1987-184-149a, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

William J. Taylor, Nenana.
Taylor Family Photographs, UAF-1987-184-149a, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Northwestern. Juneau, Alaska. The front rail is missing because it was chopped off as it was weighing the vessel down. Taylor Family Photographs, UAF-1987-184-137, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Northwestern. Juneau, Alaska. The front rail is missing because it was chopped off as it was weighing the vessel down.
Taylor Family Photographs, UAF-1987-184-137, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Caribou Café. Note on verso reads, “The man with the apron on is Angus. The woman got married a week after I came here. She comes right from Dawson City too.” Taylor Family Photographs, UAF-1987-184-145a, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Caribou Café. Note on verso reads, “The man with the apron on is Angus. The woman got married a week after I came here. She comes right from Dawson City too.”
Taylor Family Photographs, UAF-1987-184-145a, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Charles D. Jones Papers

Ulyana recently completed indexing the Charles D. Jones Papers on Alaska’s Digital Archives. Nice work Ulyana! Read on to see what she has to say about the collection.

This collection that houses signed portraits of members of the first Alaska Territorial Legislature is one of a kind. Two sets of photographs that are pasted inside two albums feature Alaska Territorial Senate and House members, first and second Governors of Alaska Territory, and Senate and House in session. The two albums belonged to Rep. Charles Davenport Jones (terr. H.R. 1913-15; terr. Sen., 1947-51, 1953-57). Throughout his career, he worked as Seward Peninsula Railway employee, prospector, miner, Alaska Road Commission foreman, and U.S. Marshal in Nome area. 

The Territory of Alaska and the Alaska Territorial Legislature were created through passage of the Second Organic Act in 1912. In 1913, the new legislators traveled to Juneau via dogsleds and a steamship. Their first act was to give women the right to vote, seven years before the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified by the states.

Charles D. Jones, Nome. First Territorial Legislature, 1913. House. Charles D. Jones Papers, UAF-913-50, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Charles D. Jones, Nome. First Territorial Legislature, 1913. House.
Charles D. Jones Papers, UAF-913-50, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

 

First Alaska Territorial House of Representatives, 1913. Charles D. Jones Papers, UAF-913-27, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

First Alaska Territorial House of Representatives, 1913.
Charles D. Jones Papers, UAF-913-27, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

 

First Alaska Territorial Senate, 1913. Charles D. Jones Papers, UAF-913-26, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

First Alaska Territorial Senate, 1913.
Charles D. Jones Papers, UAF-913-26, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Happy Halloween from APRCA!

The devilish gal in this photo is identified as Madeline Solomon.  John D. Lyle Papers, UAF-2012-133-241, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

The devilish gal in this photo is identified as Madeline Solomon.
John D. Lyle Papers, UAF-2012-133-241, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Happy Halloween from the Alaska and Polar Regions Collections & Archives!

Halloween pictures are scattered throughout our collections, proving you never can tell what gems you may find. This one is from the John D. Lyle Papers, a 3-box collection of materials about Kaltag, Alaska, a village on the Yukon River. This photo shows an adorable Madeline Solomon as a young girl dressed in a devil costume. Sorry Madeline, but you’re way cuter than you are scary. It doesn’t matter…we still love your costume! Happy Halloween everyone!

William R. Cashen Papers

Ulyana, APRCA’s rockstar processing assistant, recently completed indexing the William R. Cashen Papers on Alaska’s Digital Archives. Ulyana walks us through Cashen’s life below.

William R. Cashen Papers belonged to University of Alaska Fairbanks alumni who edited the first college newspaper, Farthest-North Collegian, from 1934 to 1937. Born in 1914 in Douglas, Alaska to a family of eight children, Bill Cashen left for Fairbanks in 1933 because of an unused Alaska Agricultural College and School of Mines scholarship that was passed down to him. He majored in Mathematics, and graduated in 1937 with General Science degree. While in school, he was a member of College Dramatic Club, and one of several students “qualified” as motion picture projectionists. Bill Cashen took his first airplane ride in Noel Wien’s airplane on July 4, 1934, and his first trip outside Alaska on the Alaska Steamship Aleutian in 1939. He became a faculty member in 1942, and was listed as an assistant professor of civil engineering and mathematics from 1943. The photographic part of the collection consists of slides that portray Alaska Agricultural College and School of Mines (University of Alaska Fairbanks) from 1915 Cornerstone Ceremony to 1970s.

First six matriculates on cornerstone – September 18, 1922. Art Loftus, Roden Davis, Earl Foster, Donald Morgan, Dorothy (Roth) Loftus, Ethel Bailey. William R. Cashen Papers, UAF-2005-6-10, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

First six matriculates on cornerstone – September 18, 1922. Art Loftus, Roden Davis, Earl Foster, Donald Morgan, Dorothy (Roth) Loftus, Ethel Bailey.
William R. Cashen Papers, UAF-2005-6-10, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

 

Jeep in front of Main Dorm – 1944. William R. Cashen Papers, UAF-2005-6-41, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Jeep in front of Main Dorm – 1944.
William R. Cashen Papers, UAF-2005-6-41, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Geophysical Institute, 1969. William R. Cashen Papers, UAF-2005-6-88, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Geophysical Institute, 1969.
William R. Cashen Papers, UAF-2005-6-88, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

E.C. Sharpe Diaries: Spinach Soup

As one way to celebrate Archives Month, some of the folks in the library volunteered to make recipes found in some of our manuscript collections. This post comes courtesy of the lovely Ms. Dee from our awesome Acquisitions and Technical Services Department. These are the people who bring you the wonderful, descriptive entries on Alaska’s Digital Archives. It’s difficult to do our work without support from them and their fantastic indexing skills.

The Sharpe Diaries also include such gems as the picture below, which shows what looks like a child’s writing exercises. Some things haven’t changed all that much since the 1880s and early 1900s. Read on to hear Ms. Dee talk about her experience with an old soup recipe from the E.C. Sharpe Diaries.

Page from Sharpe diary with children's writing. E.C. Sharpe Diaries, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks. Find it in Star Archives.

Page from Sharpe diary with children’s writing.
E.C. Sharpe Diaries, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks. Find it in Star Archives.

I chose to make the Spinach Soup recipe seen below, and transcribed as this:

Put the spinach onto
[stove?] with a tiny bit
of water. [Stew?] for
1/2 hour. Then push
through a sieve. Then
add milk – salt –
pepper – ___ – chicken

So, basically, three ingredients and two spices comprise this recipe. I wonder what made this concoction recipe-worthy to the person who wrote these simple steps down? What could have been forgotten in making up this dish? I looked over this itty bitty recipe in wonder over its simplicity.

Page from Sharpe diary with Spinach Soup recipe. E.C. Sharpe Diaries, Archives, University of Alaska Fairbanks. Find it in Star Archives.

Started with the main ingredient, the spinach.  A whole plastic bin’s worth of it in all its full leaf majesty before it was sauteed down to a shapeless mound of shriveled and shrunk leaves.

Fresh spinach leaves.

Fresh spinach leaves.

Following the recipe directions, I added in milk (I chose unsweetened almond milk).
Hmmm,  it appears more like a spinach cereal than soup.  If I added the chicken the recipe called for, it would be kicked up a notch to chicken spinach cereal.
Because I’m a vegetarian, and because chicken spinach cereal sounds gross, I didn’t add animals parts to this bowl of swimming spinach leaves.   But I couldn’t leave as is either.  Just look at this sad milky bowl of greens.  I couldn’t force myself to eat of this unappetizing  dish.
Not so appetizing yet...

Not so appetizing yet…

So I busted out the blender, and gave it a good whirl.Look at how spinach cereal transforms in all its bright green glory into a blended soup!

Dee busts out the blender.

Dee busts out the blender…

...and ends up with something new.

…and ends up with something new.

To give it some substance and let’s face it, this bowl of green stuff needed some serious flavor enhancement, I added in a pile of sauteed mushrooms., and garnished it with some crumbled cashews for crunch.

My first foray into blended soups, and it was a good one. In fact, the transformation is a bit stunning. This neon-green, creamy bisque all dolled up in mushrooms and cashews turned out to be quite handsome, quite sophisticated. A spinach soup star was born from the humblest of recipes. It was delicious.

Dee took this old recipe and re-imagined it for a modern audience. Nice work Dee!

Dee took this old recipe and re-imagined it for a modern audience. Nice work Dee!